6 Sermons You Don’t Want to Miss

1. “The World, the Flesh, and the Devil” – Voddie Baucham

I can’t tell you how often I think of this sermon. It’s shaped my view of sin and depravity and the battle against it more than I can say.

So often we emphasize one part of the threefold nature of our depravity. Calvinists emphasize the flesh. Charismatics emphasize the devil. Fundamental baptists emphasize the world. But all three parts play a huge role in the war we fight. To rightly combat sin, we must understand the true threefold nature of our depravity and the temptations we face.

2. “A Great Salvation” – R.C. Sproul

This sermon is the last one R.C. Sproul preached before his death in 2017. What a beautiful gift to end a lifetime of ministry in such a way. He is a man who taught thousands upon thousands of Christians to press into the Scripture, digging deep to unearth the priceless treasures therein. This sermon is short, but sweet.

3. “Revive Thy Work” – Frank Boydstun

Studying true revival has radically changed my life and shifted my prayers over the past two years. This sermon is an excellent starting point for the Christian who longs to see God stir the hearts of His people to repentance and simultaneously breathe new life into the lost.

Though not widely known, his preaching ought to be.

4. “Spiritual Warfare” – Jim Logan

This is actually the first of an 8 session lecture series from an international missions conference back in the 80s. I have genuinely never heard such thorough and genuinely biblical teaching on spiritual warfare.

He includes countless stories of personal and secondhand encounters with demonic activity, strongholds, etc. and how to pray in the midst of these supernatural battles.

5. “Why You Can Believe the Bible” – Voddie Baucham

Voddie gets two spots on this list simply because these two sermons have impacted me beyond what I can say. I frequently call them to mind throughout my daily life. His “thesis statement,” so to speak, from this is something I have memorized and quoted on numerous occasions. I was able to publicly dismantle the argument of a particularly aggressive college professor’s categorization of the Bible as a myth because I was armed with the truth of this message and the prompting of the Holy Spirit.

6. “The Cost of Discipleship” – Leonard Ravenhill

Ravenhill was a man with a powerful and rare anointing to preach. His sermons laden with Scripture poignantly applied call the listener to serious self-reflection in the face of Christ’s truth, to repent and lay hold of the holy calling with which we’re called. He was a close friend of pastor and writer A.W. Tozer who said this of him:

“To such men as this, the church owes a debt too heavy to pay. The curious thing is that she seldom tries to pay him while he lives. Rather, the next generation builds his sepulchre and writes his biography – as if instinctively and awkwardly to discharge an obligation the previous generation to a large extent ignored.”

— A.W. Tozer

It would be remiss to write a blog post like this and not acknowledge the sermons that have shaped me the most. Week in and week out, I sit under unknown, ordinary, faithful teachers and preachers of an extraordinary gospel. I am thankful for my pastors and elders and Sunday school teachers who not only faithfully preach the Word, but also shepherd my soul, check in on my family, and pursued with the gospel when I was still an angry and unrepentant sinner.

God’s ordained vehicle for Christian growth is the local church. Not mega conferences, not celebrity pastors, not Zoom Bible studies, not campus ministries. The church. Not *just* private times of prayer and devotion, although that is an important element of a healthy Christian life. If you aren’t involved in a doctrinally sound and healthy local church, you can use this church search engine to find a good one in your area.